Back to Metroland's Home Page!
 Columns & Opinions
   The Simple Life
   Comment
   Looking Up
   Reckonings
   Opinion
   Myth America
   Letters
 News & Features
   Newsfront
   Features
   What a Week
   Loose Ends
 Dining
   This Week's Review
   The Dining Guide
   Leftovers
 Cinema & Video
   Weekly Reviews
   The Movie Schedule
 Music
   Listen Here
   Live
   Recordings
   Noteworthy
 Arts
   Theater
   Dance
   Art
   Classical
   Books
   Art Murmur
 Calendar
   Night & Day
   Event Listings
 Classifieds
   View Classified Ads
   Place a Classified Ad
 Personals
   Online Personals
   Place A Print Ad
 AccuWeather
 About Metroland
   Where We Are
   Who We Are
   What We Do
   Work For Us
   Place An Ad

Dangerous Games

To the Editor:

Nolan Konkoski’s “No Nukes, Revisited” [Newsfront, April 28] is a generally thoughtful, perceptive article, but there are some substantial mistakes in it.

The first is his statement that Iran and North Korea “have nuclear weapons.” Not even the Bush administration, which is phobic about Iran, claims that such weapons are in Iranian hands. Furthermore, although the North Korean government has maintained that it possesses nuclear weapons, some experts doubt the reality of this contention. North Korean officials might be exaggerating their country’s military strength as a means of deterring a U.S. invasion or of bolstering its bargaining power with Washington.

A second mistake is the remark that “no nation possesses the technology to wage nuclear war on the United States.” Some nuclear powers, such as Russia and China, do have the ability to hit the United States with long-range nuclear missiles. And their missile fleets will not be blocked by the ineffectual, unworkable missile defense system (the refurbished “Star Wars”) promoted by the Bush administration or by the new U.S. nuclear weapons the Bush administration is currently advocating.

The revival of the nuclear arms race is a serious matter, both because non-nuclear nations might be working to build nuclear weapons and because nuclear nations are reneging on their Non-Proliferation Treaty commitments to nuclear disarmament and laying plans for the building of new nuclear weapons. Thus, it is good to see Metroland taking the lead in alerting people to this danger so that they can get nations back on track toward a nuclear-free world.

Lawrence S. Wittner

Albany

Just Say No

To the Editor:

After years of reading Metroland, and about a year drought, I picked up the latest issue and read “Say What” [April 14].

It both saddened and outraged me. The article’s gratuitous malice seemed to only be outdone by its insipid desire to be hip, cool and provocative. Unfortunately, all it did was come off as jaded and heartless.

Someone recently mentioned to me that the Metroland was only good for finding out movie times. After reading this article, I must agree.

Jeff Marden

Albany

Correction

In “Faith in Our Cities” (Newsfront, April 7), we wrongly stated that Arise was using a ketchup bottle to symbolize that 56 out of the 57 counties in the state had shrinking core cities compared to their suburban areas. The actual number of counties in the state is 62; Arise was referring to the 57 counties outside of New York City.

Metroland welcomes typed, double-spaced letters (computer printouts OK), addressed to the editor. Or you may e-mail them to: metroland@metroland.net. Metroland reserves the right to edit letters for length; 300 words is the preferred maximum. You must include your name, address and day and evening telephone numbers. We will not publish letters that cannot be verified, nor those that are illegible, irresponsible or factually inaccurate.

Send to:
Letters, Metroland, 4 Central Ave.,
4th Floor, Albany, NY 12210
or e-mail us at metroland@metroland.net.


 
Send A Letter to Our Editor
Back Home
   
0106_113E
 
Copyright © 2002 Lou Communications, Inc., 419 Madison Ave., Albany, NY 12210. All rights reserved.