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Free Will Fashion

To the Editor:

In regards to the article “If the Pocket Fits, Stuff It” [Looking Up, Nov. 16], I could not help but chuckle at the obvious display of ignorance it encumbered. In it, Miriam Axel-Lute complains about pants with fake pockets, manufacturers who take away consumer choices, and the pant maker’s conspiracy of stereotyping women’s looks. OK, OK, so maybe it was just mindless babble but I have complete optimism and wish to show the public that there are plenty of options out there.

Miriam is extremely enthralled at the fact that she can find infant clothes with pockets. I can pretty much bet my life that it would not take much to find women’s clothes with pockets. After all, pockets have been a huge part of our clothing since the first time a human pulled up a pair of Levi’s. Sure, there are outfits with fake pockets and the women who prefer to wear them have as much freedom to choose them as others do to avoid them.

Some pants do not have any pockets, some have fake pockets, but huge varieties have nice deep genuine pockets. People who dislike pants pockets may be peeved by the white fabric that sometimes makes its way to peek out or sick of sticking a pen down in the pocket to push the fabric into place. Why should the manufacturer be blamed for taking away the style that these pocket pushers truly prefer?

The great thing about the world of fashion is the million different brands and designs to choose from offering selection to satisfy any preference. Someone who detests fake pockets with the buttons and extra ridgey fabric is one person’s opinion and has the freedom to not buy that design.

There really is a simple solution to Miriam’s problem that does not involve upsetting the manufacturers. Simply reach your hand into the pockets before buying to see if they are real and, voila, problem solved. You try on the pants to see if they fit why shouldn’t you check to see if the pockets are real? You have as much of a choice to buy your size as to buy pants with the sort of pocket you want.

Women choose their clothing for the sake of fashion and to flaunt expensive designer brands. Yet there are plenty of perfectly comfortable designs out there as long as one is willing to choose comfort over brand names. There are a lot of great alternatives available to women making Miriam’s complaints truly irrelevant and simply childish.

The manufacturers have the freedom to make their clothes as much as the consumers have the freedom to buy them. “There was nothing about a pocket that forced one to fill it with anything.” This is true yet there is nothing about the pants in the first place that force a person to buy them. If one wants comfort and real pockets, there are enough options out there so stop complaining, stick your hand in the pocket, and shop around. After all, we live in a country that bases itself on free will.

Kelly Macken

Albany

Radio Radio

To the Editor:

Concerning the article about WRPI and the community [“Hear Today . . . ” Nov. 2]: It is interesting but, I think, one-sided. I’m sure the two people who were extensively quoted have genuine complaints but for most of us, community members, we’re getting along OK. I am only speaking for myself, but I know that the Friday community members feel that it’s a privilege to be on the radio and that minor differences can be satisfactorily worked out.

Rezsin Adams

Albany

Metroland welcomes typed, double-spaced letters addressed to the editor. Metroland reserves the right to edit letters for length or clarity; 300 words is the preferred maximum. You must include your name, address and day and evening telephone numbers. We will not publish letters that cannot be verified, nor those that are anonymous, illegible, irresponsible or factually inaccurate.

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Letters, Metroland

419 Madison Ave., Albany, NY 12210

e-mail: metroland@metroland.net

fax: 463-3726


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