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Proof

If you think last year’s Oscar-winning film A Beautiful Mind has inspired a spate of dramatic works involving mathematical genius, keep in mind that David Auburn’s play Proof premiered in 2000 and won the Pulitzer Prize in April 2001, before A Beautiful Mind had even reached movie theaters. Proof—which will have its regional premiere at Capital Repertory Theatre beginning with previews tomorrow (Friday) through Wednesday—is about much more than math, taking on such matters of the heart and mind as love, trust, reconciliation, and the fine line between genius and madness.

Catherine, a young woman who has spent years taking care of her brilliant but mentally unstable mathematician father, finds her life further complicated by the arrival of her estranged sister, Claire, and also of Hal, a former student of their father’s who hopes to find something valuable in his notebook scribbles. The drama is propelled by a power struggle between the sisters, romantic tension between Catherine and Hal, the discovery of a mysterious mathmatical proof, and Catherine’s grappling with the question of whether she has inherited any of her father’s genius—or his insanity. In addition to a Pulitzer, Proof also won a 2001 Tony Award for Best Play.

Previews of Proof, directed by Maggie Mancinelli-Cahill, begin tomorrow (Friday, Sept. 6) and continue through Wednesday (Sept. 11) at Capital Repertory Theatre, 111 N. Pearl St., Albany. Opening night is Sept. 12, and the play’s run continues through Oct. 6. There will be a pay-what-you-will performance tonight (Thursday, Sept. 5); tickets go on sale an hour before the 7:30 PM curtain. Throughout the run, curtain times are 7:30 PM Tuesday through Thursday, 8 PM Friday, 4 and 8:30 PM Saturday, and 2:30 PM Sunday, with no performances on Monday. Tickets are $30 to $38 ($23 to $28 during preview week). For tickets or information, call 445-7469.

51st Annual Stockade Villagers’ Art Show

For the 51st year, Schenectady’s most historic neighborhood hosts the Northeast’s oldest outdoor art show. On Saturday, local and national artists will take part in this juried competition, which also includes a special competition for students. Last year there were 120 artists in the event, and the organizers expect similar participation this year.

While the art is the focus of the afternoon, it’s worth noting that there’s no more beautiful neighborhood in the Capital Region than the Stockade. There are memorable architectural landmarks dating from the 1690s through the 1920s, including the largest collection of pre-Revolutionary buildings in existence. There’s something genuinely unique around every corner, so it’s worth your while to do some exploring after (or before) taking in the art.

The Stockade Villagers’ Art Show will take place Saturday (Sept. 7) from 11 AM to 5 PM at Ferry and Front streets in Schenectady’s Stockade neighborhood. The rain date is Sunday (Sept. 8) from noon to 5 PM. The event is free and open to the public. Visit www.historic stockade.com for information.

Regie Cabico

Time & Space Limited continues its Writers Reading Literary Series with a special appearance by poet Regie Cabico, who will perform an evening of poetry, comedy and biographical monologues. The Montreal Mirror summed him up briefly: “Cabico is gay, he’s Asian, he’s different and he likes to talk about it with humor.” The Village Voice observed that “Cabico’s work, with its naked emotionalism and wry theatricality, is excellent smarmy diva material.”

Here’s a sample, from the poem “tribute”: “sometimes I wear isis bracelets/and sashay down the streets like shiva/& I deliver my fierceness.”

Cabico made his name in the early 1990s, in the high-stakes, in-the-moment world of poetry slams. He has developed a reputation as a compelling performer: Seattle Weekly wrote glowingly that Cabico is “a high-energy star, a whirlwind of great comedic timing. [His] self-effacing humor and talent as a poet is . . . brilliant spoken word that sucks audience members in.” This led to stints with Lollapalooza and MTV’s Free Your Mind spoken-word tour, and apparences in strikingly varied venues, from pubs to concert halls. Cabico has published a few volumes of verse, and has been included in numerous poetry anthologies. Most recently, he was featured on Russell Simmons’ Def Poetry on HBO.

Regie Cabico will perform Saturday (Sept. 7) at 8 PM at Time & Space Limited (434 Columbia St., Hudson). Admission is $7, $5 for members. Call 822-8448 for information, or visit www.timeandspace.org.


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