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American Nightmare
Valentine’s, Friday

Had a bad week? You and Suzy having a spat? Fido pee on your new boots? Whatever the source of your malaise, it’s not healthy to keep all those angry feelings pent up inside. But don’t beat the dog—come vent in the company of Boston-based hardcore band American Nightmare instead. With their well-received recordings and vicious live shows, the young band have quickly earned an established place among the elite of the Northeast hardcore scene. They promise to be fast-paced and pissed off when they headline a show tomorrow (Friday) at Valentine’s. They’ll be joined by fellow Bostonians the Hope Conspiracy, as well as Reach the Sky, Burning Bridges and Written in Stone. (Oct. 11, 8 PM, $10, 432-6572)

Guy Clark, Mary Gauthier
Club Helsinki, Great Barrington, Mass., Saturday

It’s all too infrequent that you get the opportunity to see a real live legend in any setting other than an impersonal shed or arena. On Saturday, however, country and folk fans will get just that when Guy Clark drops by Great Barrington’s Club Helsinki. Clark is regarded as one of the foremost storytellers in American music, and country stars such as Johnny Cash, David Allan Coe and Ricky Skaggs have all scored hits with his compositions. Opening for Clark will be Mary Gauthier, whose sophomore album, Filth and Fire, was proclaimed “the best singer-songwriter album of the year thus far” by No Depression magazine. (Oct. 12, 9 PM, $25, 413-528-3394)

The Mooney Suzuki, Sahara Hotnights
Valentine’s, Sunday

On the commercial airwaves, the influence of Alice in Chains and Nine Inch Nails still reigns via the brooding strains of the nu metal, but the darlings of the alternative press these days are those bands who look a bit further back for their influences—back into the gritty, greasy history of punky garage rock. On Sunday at Valentine’s, you can sample a set of critically lauded revisionists whose biographical and geographic disparity will pretty well indicate the broad appeal and influence of the legacy of bands like the MC5, the Zombies and the Stooges. The Mooney Suzuki have a perfect pedigree for this kind of thing as Manhattanite art-school dropouts; Sahara Hotnights, on the other hand, come from out of left field as a group of Swedish chicks just barely out of their teens—not that there’s anything wrong with that, mind you. (Oct. 13, 8 PM, $10, 432-6572)

Ian Anderson
Troy Savings Bank Music Hall, Tuesday

Rubbing Elbows With Ian Anderson, as this evening is called, promises to be one of the weirder shows of the year—and we mean weird in a good way. Anderson, the longtime mastermind behind Jethro Tull, is tooting his flute with strictly non-Tull acoustic musicians this time. So, while Tull guitar hero Martin Barre is MIA, Anderson will be sharing the stage with the Wolf—as in Wakin’ Up with the Wolf’s Bob Wolf of WPYX-FM (106.5). Wolf will be up there with the band, introducing songs and special guests. (Kevin Thompson, formerly of Strange Arrangement, is slated to be one of the local guests.) As Anderson explains, the show is “two-thirds music, one-third talk show.” So, along with acoustic versions of new songs and Tull standards, there is supposed to be a kind of freewheeling repartee between Anderson, Wolf, and selected audience members. The uncertainty factor—will this unusual mix of music and conversation work?—makes this show really intriguing. (Oct. 15, 8 PM, $29, 273-0038)

 

 also noted
Seth Cluett

There’s gonna be a new place to hang in Troy soon—if you’re into music and arts performances, lectures, and the like—and the arts-space-in-the-making (found at 51 Third St.) is holding a pre-unveiling event tonight (Thursday) with a presentation by sculptor John Reed, who will discuss and present his work of experimental musical instruments. You’ll get a chance to see the raw space before it’s transformed, and if you’re really good, you can play one of Reed’s homemade instruments, as there will be a rehearsal/jam following the lecture (the whole shebang will then relocate to Artie’s Lansingburgh Station and contribute to that venue’s open mike). Call 270-5119 for information on any of the above. . . . Savannah’s will hold its third annual Bad Ass Bass Player Show tonight, with Jack Daley (bassist with Lenny Kravitz) playing with his brother Joe (drummer for Super 400) and Kenny Hohman (Super 400’s axman); also on the bill, bassist James Scott teams with Art Adams and Myron Thomas (both of Stratosphere), and bassist Steve Aldi performs with Alan Payette Band members Alan Payette and Tommy Verrigni (10 PM, 426-9647). . . . Mary Prankster will play their CD-release show at Valentine’s tonight [see Club Box, page 48]. . . . Back to Troy, the second in Music of the Spheres, a series of shows at the Lally Planetarium (in the Junior Museum, 105 8th St., Troy), will take place tomorrow (Friday). Seth Cluett, Troy-based video/experimental music artist (among too many other things to list), will perform “still motion sonic photography” and “explore auditory ‘pictures’ of environments, both natural and human-made in surround sound, while taking a tour through our home galaxy and beyond.” Show up stoned (7 PM, $5, 235-2120). . . . Tribal Tech guitarist Scott Henderson will play two shows at the Van Dyck on Friday (7 and 9:30 PM, $20, 381-1111). . . . Jazz legend David Brubeck brings his quartet to the Troy Savings Bank Music Hall tomorrow (8 PM, $26, $30, 273-0038).
. . . Joshua Redman’s Elastic Band, with drummer Brian Blade and organist Sam Yayhel, will play the Egg Friday (8 PM, $24, 473-1845). . . . The Egg’s American Roots & Branches concert series continues with the Jerry Douglas Band and the Sam Bush Band performing Saturday, and New York Banjo, featuring Bela Fleck, Bill Keith, Richie Stearns, Tony Trischka and others playing on Sunday (Sat: 8 PM, $24, Sun: 7 PM, $26; 473-1845). . . . China White will play Valentine’s on Saturday [see Listen Here, page 26]. . . . David Lindley & Wally Ingram play the Van Dyck on Saturday and the Iron Horse on Wednesday [see Night & Day, page 41]. . . . MotherJudge is helming a coffeehouse-style musical offering with monthly shows at St. John’s Lutheran Church in Albany. The first takes place this Tuesday, with Mitch Elrod and MotherJudge and the Urban Holiness Society performing (7 PM, free). . . . Troy again: Positively 4th Street, renamed B.R. Finley’s, offers a cool weekly Tuesday-night thing that lures a culture of creativity with video and music from the RPI community and beyond. (Our sincerest apologies, as this has been going on for some time—we ramp up slowly). This Tuesday, Andrew Neumann and Walter Wright will provide the evening’s requisite enlightening sensual stimulation. Now that we’ve come clean, we promise to keep you posted on this ongoing phenomenon (10 PM, free, 271-9190).



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